The Steampunk Empire

The Crossroads of the Aether

A discussion about preferred libations, concoctions, elixirs, along with various tobacco products (a good cigar or pipe perhaps?) Tell us, good people, what do you find most refreshing, soothing, inspiring. Any concoctions of your own invention? Recently, Prof. DeMurgatroyd and I were privileged enough to taste not one, but two, delicious beverage inventions and we were greatly impressed. The first, a martini, made from London Dry Gin shaken (gently) with lemon juice and topped with sparkling white wine. The second (which we found MOST inspiring!) was a delicious combination of Patron Silver Tequila with agave nectar and lime juice. Finding agave nectar is NOT an easy task, I can assure you, so in the absence of that elusive substance, I decided to make my own concoction, that of the said Patron Tequila, with an equal part of simple syrup, shaken with ice and a 1/3 part of fresh squeezed lime juice. Served over ice in a sugar-rimmed glass (although I'm sure salt rimmed or none will do quite well), adorned with more fresh lime. It led to some wonderful visionary experiences (the good Prof. and I are always welcoming such moments) as well as a light and airy intoxication, as opposed to a heavy, overwhelming (and sometimes unpleasant) experience. As I am aware that Prof. Moone is himself (among other things) an esteemed mixologist, perhaps he, along with the rest of you here, might share some of your own favorites...have at it, what say?

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While traveling with some fine companions in the Society for Creative Anachronism, I was introduced to a fine drink called Mage's Fire. Herewith, is the recipe.

Mage's Fire
Ingredients:

* 2 parts Vodka
* 1 part Cinnamon schnapps
* 1 part Blue Curacao

Mixing instructions:

Start with the vodka in a bottle. Mix in the schnapps, then add the curacao. Mix well. This mixture should be chilled at least 24 hours before serving, and is best served cold.

Cheers!
Sounds oh so exotic! Must try it sometime soon! Thank you for your contribution!
Enjoyed plenty of refreshment from this outstanding Artillery Punch recipe while campaigning in India with this splendid fellow named "Sharpe"...perhaps some of you are acquainted with him...

Artillery Punch

INGREDIENTS
1 quart strong black tea
1 quart rye or blended whiskey
1 (750 ml) bottle red wine
1 pint dark rum
1/2 pint brandy
2 ounces Bénédictine
1 pint fresh orange juice
1/2 pint fresh lemon juice
Twists of lemon peel for each glass

INSTRUCTIONS
Pour the tea, whiskey, wine, rum, brandy, Bénédictine, orange juice, and lemon juice into a large bowl over a large disk of ice. Stir until blended, and refrigerate for 1 hour. Serve in chilled glasses, and garnish with lemon peel.
Oh my! This is indeed intriguing...my dear Prof. and I are great admirers of all of the above ingredients...particularly the rum. Could definitely be something to look into on the upcoming cold winter months. Cheers and thank you!
Not wanting to start any debates about Martinis, what constitutes a real Martini or no (I never met one by any name or recipe that I did not want to at least sample,) dry versus non-dry, gin versus vodka, etcetera, I put forth this recipe that is my standard "go-to" at finer establishments...for civility's sake, let us call it "The Dirty Bird"...

3 parts Grey Goose Vodka
1 part dry vermouth
1 dash olive brine
Ice
Olives (medium, so as to not take up so much room in the glass)

Shake all indgredients in a shaker (save the olives) making them nice and cold and frosty
Pour into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with olives.
Savor

I look forward to trying any and all Martini recipes you would care to share here.
Cheers!, save the olives,
...of course, don't save the olives, eat the little prats...to the victor, after all...
Sounds like what I call a "dirty martini" of which I am a very big fan! Try bleu cheese stuffed olives (if you can acquire them) next time for a real taste treat! Also, "hot" (spicy) olives are quite good as well... True, I do not consider a true martini to be made with vodka, but instead with London Dry Gin, however, I, like you, shall not turn up my nose on a "mere technicality" such as what kind of intoxicant is used...all are quite favored in my book! Cheers!
Yes, the dirty martini is my standard. Now as to gin, I had a bad experience while a lad with a bottle o mother's ruin, and have hunkered down in its presence ever since. But, being somewhat, shall we say, more "mature" now, I should give it a second chance, and maybe even a third or fourth to insure that I am partaking properly. I shall reload my cocktail magazine with a good, dry gin as soon as is practicable and report the results. My best to you and yours, and I hope we may share toasts very, very soon!

Your Humble Tobias

Killick, RSM, Ret.
My dear Mr. Killick, do not EVER give up on gin...'tis quite a forgiving tonic and as it has apparently been many years since your most unfortunate experience, you may find that all unpleasantness has disappeared from said intoxicant. It was indeed my very first alcoholic beverage experience and was quite fitting as I partook of it during an intermission at a play in London's west end. Although I have grown to love many other beverages and fine wines, gin will always be (to quote a Miss Eliza Doolittle) "mother's milk" to me. Cheers!
For the cold nights coming up, especially when in the great outdoors, I highly recomend a brew called the Canadian Hunter.

* 1 part Bourbon Whiskey
* 1 part Rye Whiskey


Usually served over ice, but that should be easy depending on the situation. May seem a little hard on more sensitive palates, but this libation works wonders when needed.
Oh my! Sounds dangerous!!
Currently enjoying a slight alteration of this marvelous recipe...

1 part Maker's Mark Bourbon
1 part Jameson Irish Whiskey

very smooth, very tasty...

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